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The cut quality of a diamond is what gives it its fire, sparkle, and brilliance. The attraction and beauty of a specific diamond are largely determined by its cut quality.

The GIA Diamond Cut Grading System is based on the evaluation of seven components for typical round brilliants in the D-to-Z color range. The first three — brilliance (the total amount of light reflected by a diamond), fire (the dispersion of light into the colors of the spectrum), and scintillation (the pattern of light and dark areas in a diamond, as well as the flashes of light, or sparkle, when a diamond is moved) — are all aesthetic characteristics. The remaining four characteristics — weight ratio, durability, polish, and symmetry — pertain to the design and workmanship of a diamond.

Following the extraction of a raw diamond, it is analyzed to find the best possible cut in order to keep the greatest clarity, color, and carat weight. The terms cut and form is often used interchangeably. They conceive of cut in terms of the diamond’s form or contour, rather than the arrangement of facets necessary to give an appealing face-up look.

The most common form of diamond jewelry is round. All other forms are referred to be fancy shapes. The marquise, pear, and oval are all examples of conventional fancy forms. Additionally, diamond jewelry with hearts, triangles, and a variety of other shapes is gaining fashionable.

Recognize the Four C’s of Diamonds

Color, clarity, cut, and carat weight – the four most critical attributes to consider when purchasing a diamond.

Color

The hue of a diamond is entirely determined by what you cannot see. Diamonds are valued according to their colorlessness – the less color, the more valuable they are. (Except for fancy colored diamonds such as pinks and blues, which fall outside of this color spectrum.) The majority of diamonds sold in jewelry shops are colorless to near-colorless, with faint yellow or brown tints.

The GIA’s color-grading system for diamonds is the gold standard in the industry. The scale starts with the letter D, which denotes colorlessness, and progresses to the letter Z, which denotes pale yellow or brown. Each letter grade has a distinct color appearance range. Color-graded diamonds are determined by comparing them to known-color stones under controlled lighting and viewing circumstances.

Numerous color differences are so faint that they are completely imperceptible to the untrained eye. However, these minute changes create a significant difference in terms of diamond quality and price.

Clarity

Due to the severe conditions under which diamonds developed deep inside the earth, they often have distinctive birthmarks, either internal (inclusions) or exterior (flaws) (blemishes).

The lack of these flaws and imperfections is referred to as diamond clarity. Diamonds without these birthmarks are very uncommon, and rarity has an effect on the value of a diamond. The GIA International Diamond Grading SystemTM assigns a clarity grade to diamonds ranging from flawless (FL) to those with visible inclusions (I3).

Each diamond is distinct. None are ideal at ten times magnification, but a few come close. These are referred to as Flawless diamonds and are very uncommon. The majority of jewelers have never seen one.

The GIA Clarity Scale has eleven classifications, with the majority of diamonds classified as VS (very slightly included) or SI (slightly included). The GIA method assigns a clarity grade based on the size, nature, location, color or relief, and a number of observable clarity features under ten magnifications.

Flawless (FL) – No imperfections or defects are apparent with 10 magnifications to a qualified grader.

Internally Flawless (IF) – No inclusions and only imperfections are apparent with 10 magnification to a trained grader.

Very, Very Slightly Included (VVS1 and VVS2) – Under ten magnification, it is difficult for a professional grader to detect inclusions.

Very Slightly Included (VS1 and VS2) — Inclusions are modest and vary from difficult to reasonably easy to discern under 10x magnification for a good grader.

Slightly Included (SI1 and SI2) – Inclusions are visible under 10x magnification to a professional grader.

Included (I1, I2, and I3) – Inclusions are visible at a magnification of ten times and may impair transparency and brightness.

Cut

The terms cut and form is often used interchangeably. They conceive of cut in terms of the diamond’s form or contour, rather than the arrangement of facets necessary to give an appealing face-up look.

The most common form of diamond jewelry is round. All other forms are referred to be fancy shapes. The marquise, pear, and oval are all examples of conventional fancy forms. Additionally, diamond jewelry with hearts, triangles, and a variety of other shapes is gaining fashionable.

While there are several factors to consider when evaluating the cut look and quality of round brilliant diamonds, an individual’s tastes also factor in. Due to the fact that each cut grade has a diverse range of proportion sets, people are allowed to choose the look they desire within the grade range.

In carats (Weight)

Diamonds and other jewels are measured in metric carats; one carat weighs around 0.2 grams or roughly the same as a paperclip. (Do not be confused with karat, as in “18K gold,” which refers to the purity of the metal.)

A carat is split into 100 points in the same way as a dollar is divided into 100 cents. A 50-point diamond, for example, weighs 0.50 carats. However, two diamonds of the same weight might have vastly different values depending on their clarity, color, and cut. The bulk of diamonds used in exquisite jewelry has a carat weight of less than one.

Precision is critical, since even a fraction of a carat may make a significant difference in cost. Weight is often measured in the diamond business in hundred-thousandths of carat increments and rounded to the nearest hundredth of a carat. Carats and decimals are used to represent diamond weights larger than one carat. (For example, a 1.08 carat stone might be referred to as “one point eight carats” or “one eight.”)

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